Posts tagged: employee engagement

Take Aim at the Heart of your Workforce for Maximum Engagement

By John Schaefer, March 8, 2017 10:08 pm

In order to maximize performance, it’s important to understand the cross-section of a typical work force. It’s common for a normal group to have 15% of its employees in a top, elite group. On the other hand, 15% may be disengaged or problem employees. This leaves the bulk of your work force, 70%, in the middle.
The group at the top consists of self-motivated, talented employees. Most of these people are experienced and take it upon themselves to do their jobs in the best way possible. This elite group produces outstanding results whatever the motivational factors may be.

On the reverse side, the bottom 15% is generally unmotivated and disengaged. This bottom percentile does not have experience and most likely will never obtain it as they bounce from one job to the next. These people more than likely will not be with you in the future.

The group that makes up the major portion of your work force is the middle 70%. The results, records, and bottom line of your organization are dependent on whether this middle percentile can be motivated and trained to improve. The individuals within this middle group must feel they have an attainable goal and will be recognized for improving their personal performance. It is unrealistic in their minds to strive to be better than the elite employees.

When structuring a performance recognition strategy, it’s important to focus on this middle 70%. Programs that only highlight the top 15% spend money on people who will probably accomplish similar results independently. The focus should be on the portion of the work force that will bring the biggest return. Every employee in the middle 70% should feel they have the ability and opportunity to achieve pre-set goals.

In many situations, we have found that incentive dollars and manager time are directed incorrectly. Most of the time and resources are spent with the low achievers who will not be with the organization in the future, while most of the incentive budget is spent on the high achievers who would have accomplished similar results independently. Focus on motivating and engaging the middle 70% and watch your performance improve.

You’ve heard this called “the 80-20 Rule”; I call it “the See-Saw Effect”. Give me a call or shoot me an email if you’d like to know more about how the See-Saw Effect may be costing you time, money and engagement levels.

To learn more about Awards, Rewards and the best ways to use them to optimize our investments in your people visit http://www.SchaeferRecogntionGroup.com or email me personally at john@SchaeferRecognitionGroup.com.

Five Steps to an Effective People Strategy

By John Schaefer, June 7, 2016 12:50 pm

In today’s economy there are few things a company can do that will have greater financial benefits over time than developing an well thought-out, comprehensive and compelling People Strategy. Here’s a five step plan that may help you get a sense of how easy this can be to implement at your organization:

Step1 – Know Who You Are
The trick to it is in first making sure that your strategy is in line with the company’s overriding Purpose, as well as your Mission, Values, Goals and Growth Plans. This is easier said than done, because many organizations find at this stage that they don’t yet have a good feel for why they exist and the best types of people to attract that will help them achieve their goals. I suggest going through this exercise before attempting a formal People Strategy.

Step 2 – Recruiting
Once you know why you exist and what you’re really about as an organization, it’s helpful to create a recruiting methodology that coincides with your Purpose, Culture and Style, so you attract people with a share vision and views. This will insure greater retention and reduce costly turnover of employees who don’t fit comfortably within the company. While we work with clients on a wide range of award and reward programs to improve employee engagement, performance and value, we can show that a small reduction in turnover alone will pay for the bulk of your investment in recognition; so this is a big deal!

Step 3 – Awards/Rewards and Incentives
A good strategy should combine all of the ways you touch employees. This includes everything from simple, no-cost day-to-day appreciation to periodic recognition that thanks people for their efforts, and then a series of well formulated performance management incentives. While this may take time to develop, as you don’t want to overwhelm people with too much too soon, we suggest picking the “low-hanging fruit”; the hand full of behavioral initiatives that when improved, will have the greatest impact on savings or profit. This will get things rolling in the right direction, so leadership will be open to adding more measurables to the platform and yield even more returns over time.

Step 4 – Training
Finally, it’s important to properly train your managers to understand both How and Why to use recognition effectively. If you launch your program with well-informed leadership, excited about the program and ready to use it, you have the best chance of coming across as believable, winning employee trust and launching a long term People Strategy that has high levels of participation, as well as provable ROI. You’d be surprised how many companies spend a ton of time creating the perfect program with a balance of all the right messaging and measurables, and then miss the mark by launching it with minimal gusto and low enthusiasm.

Step 5 – Rinse and Repeat
The most overlooked part of most programs we review is the Measurement & Analysis. If you don’t actively track, measure, tweak and work to optimize your program content and communications on a regular basis, it will likely to lose momentum and the results will slow. We see a lot of situations where elements of an initially vibrant recognition program have decended to nothing more than entitlements, being dangled to entice activity, not properly rewarding positive growth. A support team that monitors and manages your program to keep it fresh, relevant and engaging is key to getting the most out of your People Strategy.

We call this entire process an Umbrella Recognition Solution. When you’re ready to embark on this project for your company, we would be happy to offer some thoughts and ideas that may help you make it the best it can be.

To learn more about Awards, Rewards and the best ways to use them to optimize our investments in your people visit http://www.SchaeferRecogntionGroup.com or email me personally at john@SchaeferRecognitionGroup.com.

Why Millennials Don’t Want to Work for You

By John Schaefer, December 14, 2015 10:34 am

I’m always impressed by how well my friend Louis Efron captures the reality of our current generational employee challenges. Leading with a focus on Corporate Purpose, Louis consistently captures the keys to business success and growth defining simple, logical and practical ways of engaging today’s diverse workforce for maximum job satisfaction, value and profit.

His latest Forbes article talks about the best ways to capture the interest and harness the value of today’s Gen Y and the upcoming Gen Z employees. This group is estimated to make up 40% of your workforce by 2020, so this is not an insignificant issue. Check out the article and let me know if you have any questions or would like to discuss ways to integrate your recognition, employee engagement and performance management strategies around a goal of better engaging your growing team of Millennials.

Louis Efron Forbes Article

To learn more about Awards, Rewards and the best ways to use them to optimize our investments in your people visit http://www.SchaeferRecogntionGroup.com or email me personally at john@SchaeferRecognitionGroup.com.

Keynote presentation on Employee Engagement at HRMAsia Congress in Singapore

By John Schaefer, October 12, 2014 10:49 am

Last month I was honored to be invited to present the Keynote presentation at HRMAsia Congress in Singapore. What an amazing place! While it’s halfway around the word, I felt very welcomed and appreciated as part of an impressive group of experts. While everyone spoke English, I was joined on stage by accents from Asia, Europe and India … it felt very international and I hope I represented the USA appropriately.

The Asian audience is quiet and respectful, as well as hungry for new ideas on how to effectively engage employees, recognize key contributions and get the most out of their Performance Management investments. The other speakers included some very experienced HR professionals from companies like eBay, PalPay, American Express, Intel and more. Mr. Yoke Fei Phan, Group Human Resources and Administration Head at Auric Pacific Group Limited, put on a skit with two of his young employees demonstrating the difference between Gen Y and the upcoming Gen Z employee base … better get your mobile applications ready; it appears that Gen Z will do nothing that isn’t on their smart devices!

While I tweaked my message a little, my main points remained strong … it’s all about Employee Perception and the effectiveness of recognition is directly related to your level of trust, transparency, vulnerability, and whether your people believe your motives are true. Because I had two hours, I was able to lead the group in several exercises around identifying which of the Ten Levels of Workplace Disillusionment were most prevalent in their offices, Which Love Languages motivated them the most and how some of their specific recognition, employee engagement and performance management programs were working. It was a very enlightening opportunity to share how top organizations are using a combination of old-school communications and new technology to optimize their most valuable resource – people!

I want to thank my hosts for bringing me to their beautiful city and making me feel both valued and welcome. Thanks also to the many participants who make me confident that the future of the world’s workforce is going to be in good hands. Being part of the international community is humbling and I look forward to more opportunities to work with and grow in my knowledge of how the goals of improving employee behaviors toward shared goals will be one of the ways that we as a planet will emerge from our struggling economy. The future looks very bright to me!

We use this same approach to help our clients organize all of their company’s recognition, performance management, motivation and training programs into a single strategy – it’s called the Umbrella Recognition Solution.  To learn more, visit us at http://www.SchaeferRecogntionGroup.com .

New SHRM study on Job Satisfaction and Employee Engagement – so what’s new?

By John Schaefer, May 14, 2014 9:08 pm

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) recently published the 2013 findings on the new trends in Employee Engagement and Job Satisfaction.  Some if it’s no surprise, but there are a few areas that should be important to HR executives tasked to optimize their human resources.

Here are a few facts from the study:

  1. Job satisfaction stayed at 81%, flat from 2012.  This is not a big surprise, as the economy and governmental uncertainty has not changes very much.
  2. 94% or respondents believe that positive feedback has an impact on improving performance, yet a full 19% of companies report no formal performance management program.  Here again, no surprises, as when the economy is tight, companies get a pass on recognition as fewer employees will leave for fear of not finding another job.  Sadly, when the economy turns, close to 70% of employees will be looking for a better opportunity. Kind of a chicken and the egg situation, and bad news for companies that aren’t taking care of their people now.
  3. Job security leads the list of employee concerns at 59% and that also makes a lot of sense.  With economic growth at close to a standstill and one of the lowest labor participation rates in history, employees are more worried than ever that there will.  Respondents showing compensation concerns are up from 50% to 60% aligning with higher job security worries.
  4. 73% shared that relationships with coworkers is the most important area in engagement. This may offer a clue as to why recognition programs with both Manager to Peer and Peer to Peer awards perform better than top down recognition alone.

Overall, there’s nothing surprising, new or unexpected.  It still all comes down to employee engagement, but herein lies the problem – what defines engagement in today’s workplace?  Some experts say that all you have to do is pat your people on the head regularly and show that you appreciate their work.  Others say that recognition for traditional measures like longevity, attendance, safety and wellness if the key.  Still others argue that it’s all about measurable behaviors, like sales, customer service, and client retention, and driving performance that yields ROI.

Wish it were that easy, but in reality, their all right.  If you truly value your people, you have to show it; and they have to believe your mean it.  It also makes sense to promote initiatives they reduce turnover, lower accident rates and keep insurance costs in check.  The folks in the C-suite want to know that the money invested in people is offering a return, so measuring improved behaviors drives the results.

We believe that it comes down to a balance of all of the above, tied in the a training-based approach to engage the management team first, then a realistic way for employees to feel the love while also sharing in the benefits of their improved productivity.  Sounds simple and makes a lot of sense, but it can be tricky.  Employees must trust you and believe that your motives are sound. Only then will they feel good about helping the company be all it can be.

Don’t be the last one to the party or it could be too late and your top performers will have found greener pastures.  Set a goal to improve top down communication, create a consistent believable message structured around realistic goals and objectives, then launch a balanced program through an enthusiastic team of supervisors that understand what’s in it for them and want to see it work.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Panorama Theme by Themocracy